BOSTES and UNSW – how ICT impacts on curriculum and assessment . . .

How does ICT impact on curriculum and assessment? What a coincidence that I  presented the SAME topic TWICE in one week to TWO completely different audiences?

This week has been a busy one, TWO firsts – presenting to the BOSTES Inspector team AND to a uni class of Masters of Ed students at UNSW. The OTHER common factor between both of these events (besides being a first for me) was the topic ” Impacts of ICT on curriculum and assessment” . . .

The BOSTES presentation was with two other teachers – Gavin Hays, Assistant Principal  from Parramatta Marist and Andrew Burgess, E-Learning Co-ordinator from Lismore Diocese who operates the Online Education Centre. We each spoke about technology implementation, tools, challenges and successes in our school, the questions from the Inspector Team and Howard Kennedy (Director of Curriculum and Assessment Standards) were focused on curriculum support, access to classroom technologies, staff PD as well as supporting ICT’s with BOSTES tools such as program builder.

My own learning notes from the day were related to using PBL to heighten engagement, Google Classroom developments, challenges in selecting a good LMS and how we can teach stage related skills in ICTs throughout projects, tasks, classroom interactions and in online learning environments.

It was awesome to hear both Andrew and Gavin talk, I loved hearing about what they were doing in schools and how they were making positive changes for learning.

MY BOSTES presentation:

At UNSW I was lucky enough to be paired with Pip Cleaves in a class with 24 Masters of Ed students, John Bennett has been running similar talks with his class for the past three years – I could see the purpose and value in tonight solely by the classes questions and sharing.

Questions were related to: fitting in content amongst project work, being comfortable with trying something different, logistics, examples of KLA tasks, challenges in terms of internet connects and finance, classroom design, finding time, selecting tech tools for the right application, being a leader amongst staff, engaging students, differentiating content AND collaboration.

Pip’s experience is invaluable – her knowledge of platforms, tools, devices, classroom applications is so broad! I loved how she moved around the room and spoke with her hands! – this was novel to me as Pip and I have spoken MORE online than in real life 😉

Pip took a photo of me during the talk, being photographed while doing something like this is a little weird right? – I saved the image because one of the questions I asked of the class was “what would your students say of your teaching? & classes?” – in this photo I am looking through their eyes. Pip moved around in her zippy form, while I was more still? Being at the front of the room heavily instructing or information cramming it not something I am used to doing. So while I appreciate Pip’s gorgeous words, the image itself is JUST STRANGE!? and how I was still was strange?? – AND I did it TWICE in ONE WEEK?!

UNSW

My UNSW presentation:

It was a personal highlight to talk about the staff and students at Emmaus for the first time. Even though this is a new role and school community for me I felt so proud to share their great work with others. We are on an exciting learning journey!

My take aways from both of these presentations is that I am lucky to be in such great company professionally, likewise our students are in good hands. There are many challenges in the implementation of ICT in schools, these challenges do add another dimension to the work teachers have to do. However, each lot of presenters and audiences were focused on students learning and solving problems, the technologies that were discussed were referenced as tools to propel this.

LINKS and stuff I may have forgotten. . . . 

Example of a flipped youtube for TAS – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVUjn1QYo4g&feature=youtu.be

Teachers are using Weebly, this is what STUDENTS can do with WEEBLY – http://emmausdigitallearning.weebly.com/

MORE about the Student Techie Team – https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/student-techies-at-gilroy-voiced-2014/

Information about LEARNING INTENTIONS: http://www.assessmentforlearning.edu.au/professional_learning/learning_intentions/learning_intentions_landing_page.html

PINTEREST as a bookmarking TOOL- https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/using-pinterest-in-my-classroom/

HUGE thanks to my arty mate Jess McCarthy, she made my UNSW presso pretty amaze.

To flip, or not to flip. THAT is the question. . .

Last year was a year of trying new things, amongst the new “things” I tried – – flipping my classroom was one. This post is a little reflection of my flipped experiences and the reasons WHY I dabbled in film making last year.

 

. . . We had an AMAZING teachmeet at Gilroy in August, Simon Harper AND Polly Dunning presented their experiences flipping their classroom, even though I was reading a lot about flipping and its benefits at the time they really inspired me to start.

NOTE: I am not an expert at flipping, in my limited experience of flipping and from my esteemed colleagues/online reading this is what I knew:

  • Flipping means students do traditional CLASSWORK at home 
  • Cleverly, teachers make this fun, presented in an engaging way (video)
  • AND the content that is covered is usually content that is traditionally covered in class
  • ALLOWING for MORE class time to be spent on the analysis and application of content.

Sounds like a GREAT idea right?! . . . yeah- it is BUT my reasons for flipping were TOTALLY DIFFERENT!! I teach across all areas of technology in junior years, this includes timber, textiles and food technology project areas. We have 5 lessons a fortnight (5 hours) and only a 13 week rotation to complete a program, booklet, design folio and practical project.  . . .HECTIC!!!

I loved the idea of flipping, because:

  • I typically demonstrated practical skills ONCE – then students had to mimick, copy or do
  • Students watched my practical demonstrations that may have shown ONE particular method for doing something, there could be many applications (of a timber joint or decorative technique for example) time usually constraint this OR the busy nature of classroom numbers did
  • My classes in 2012 had a diverse range of students- levels of language, literacy, numeracy as well as physical capabilities
  • Some students were getting frustrated- at not being able to achieve a level of practical quality they expected
  • Many students were visual learners, current resources were not tailored to their learning style
  • Students WANTED to be more independent, they wanted to succeed on their own.

So, what REALLY propelled my to start to flip was- MY STUDENTS WANTED to become an expert in practical skills, they needed to have a DEEPER understanding of “something” before they were confident to try and apply it (I just want to be clear on something, I am not talking about their willingness to fail/make mistakes) – I am saying they WANTED TO DO BETTER, THEY WANTED TO WORK HARDER, THEY WANTED TO KNOW MORE and OUR CLASSTIME and MY CURRENT TEACHING METHODS didn’t allow it!!??

So, flipping essentially added extra hours to my classes. I used vimeo to upload my own video/links to edmodo, I also used existing youtube videos and tube chop to edit them.

I sourced videos on garnish techniques, handling pastry, sewing a closed seam, creating your own applique from felt, setting up jigs for a trimmer/router, using a router to create inlays, making your own bees wax polish and making the perfect white sauce.

I also made my own videos! With the help of another staff member we pre-recorded food demonstrations- students watched these on average 3 times EACH (this was 30-40mins of video time??!!) Students were also creating/sharing their own videos?? “Miss – can I film you doing this and practice at home?”  – –  umm OF COURSE YOU CAN!!!  (by this stage, I had totally gotten over the fact that once recorded, by voice sounds like a kid’s!! lol)

I dont really know if this truly is “flipping” ?? as I still felt the need in most cases to demonstrate and conduct the SAME practical demonstrations in lessons – BUT the videos really supplemented this and addressed all the concerns I was having. . . .

THE RESULT: I had VERY HAPPY STUDENTS. Their quality of practical work improved because they were conducting more research at home – I know, this really is a “DERR” moment right? And this is not too dissimilar to the benefits that Polly and Simon had explained at the TeachMeet, but you have to understand, the motivation that DROVE me to spend the time preparing all the videos/links WAS. 

Again, I repeat – I AM NOT AN EXPERT OF FLIPPING, making videos or screencasting (check out Simons blog for inspiring examples of this). Is this even flipping?? dont think so??– BUT, my students were pretty happy.

Polly and Simon certainly showed me a way of adding another dimension to my teaching that I will continue to use in 2013 – I seriously advise you to start whatever hybrid of flipping suits you !!