What our students need. . . .

 

 

  • At the end of last year I surveyed our teaching staff in reference to students digital skills.

  • Emmaus is in a phase of transition with technologies – in 2016 we will have two year groups with 1:1 iPads.

 

In my time at Gilroy I lead and programmed a subject that the Principal and Assistant Principal started that was called Integrated Learning, IL started as a course designed to teach skills for learning but as our students needs changed it became a cross-curricular subject that taught DIGITAL SKILLS.

For more info on IL you can read about it here: https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/how-integrated-learning-works-at-gilroy-with-ipads/

The time has come for Emmaus students to have the same opportunity, with a timetabling success our past Principal Brad Campbell is leaving me a legacy of TIME. The hour a week class is called iLearn.

 

Because no school is the same (students certainly aren’t!) I sought to better understand from both a teachers and students perspective of what digital skills were needed. . . . (*note I did NOT edit responses, but have not included all)

 

Our 2015 year 7 students were asked:

What was your most MEMORABLE LEARNING experience this year when using technologies?
  • Playing kahoot – popular response!!
  • The iMovie we did for religion, that was really enjoyable.
  • My memorable experience this year using technology was when I was designing a room for my tech assessment in the 1st & 2nd term.
  • I think the most memorable learning experience this year when using technology is making different group projects
  • Science- We had an assignment where we had to build an Island and the class used MineCraft to build it.
What is your FAVE app:
  • Notability
  • Pic Collage
  • Popplet
Subject I use my iPad in the MOST:
  • Science
  • Tech
  • Religion

My take homes are: they LOVE creating, interactive tasks, they like apps that keep them organised and present their work beautifully. 

 

Our staff were asked:

What deficits do you see in students digital skills:
  • I think that there is a lack of core skills. We assume that as digital natives that they are aware and know how to use apps etc; however, they do need to have framing done for them and have the foundation skills placed down in front of them. There needs to be a distinction made between tool and toy; by that I mean that their various devices can add to learning rather than being a distraction. And that they can see the social networking and media devices can be used an meaningful learning devices.
  • Knowing how to find reliable sources online! Very surprised when I have worked with students and they didn’t know what a “blog” was!
  • Using the Internet to research Using Word/PPT – or Google docs effectively
  • – researching difficulties / discernment of reliable sources – accurate referencing of sources – difficulties achieving a quality product…

What digital skills would you like student to develop further?

  • Research skills that help them identify more than just the obvious webpage.
  • Ability to translate research into their own words and determine the validity of the website they use for the research
  • Smoother integration of electronic work and written book work

My take homes are: research and information seeking is an apparent concern, organisation skills are mentioned but not as prominent as authoring.

 

 

So, these holidays i have been busy working on the iLearn program, there are SIX UNITS:

Digital Native: Technologies are a big part of our lives, at the age they are at they have always known technology and are considered digital natives. This unit will set the standard of digital expectations for the course and year group in: netiquette, behaviour, rules and quality of work. Technologies DO make their lives easier and CAN enhance their learning IF used to their potential and safely. Students will connect to the network and download their school apps as part of the iPad roll out.

Copy Write: You cannot just simply GOOGLE? Research skills are important foundation skills for secondary students, they need to be able to SEARCH, DISCRIMINATE, FILTER and REFINE their research. This unit of work will look at tricks and tips to use when researching online, how to be a discriminate seeker of information AND how to implement researched content WITHOUT plagiarism.

Monster Maintenance Manual:  The aim of this unit is to demonstrate the variety of apps they have on their device and HOW they can LINK and work together to create a project outcome much like a school assessment. They will digitally submit their work, collating their final chapters as one class book using tools like BookCreator and Drive. They will write a chapter of their own that includes: image, text, audio based on the work of an existing text/author (“The Monster Maintenance Manual – A Spotters Guide”)

Moral of the Story: Each student has a story to tell, this unit looks at different ways of expressing their stories – focusing on a stop animation movie. Students will have created a movie that is produced to demonstrate a chosen MORAL or MESSAGE that is important to them, their family or community.

My Best Selfie: Students have a digital footprint. My best selfie is about promoting their LEARNING as something to be proud of. In Technology Mandatory they have started a personal blog/website, this unit will continue the work of that subject by getting students to share and promote their learning success. We will look further into Cyber Bullying and Digital Footprint, the focus is to produce a positve one!

Game On: Students are gaming consumers! This unit will demonstrate how they can create an app, a game and share it with their classmates. We might see the next upcomming developers and coders in this unit!

 

 

I have attached the programs and scope so far for you to read, evaluate, use and maybe even give me some feedback?! I need to attribute the 21st Century Fluency project for their resources and training I did in 2012 as well as the Author of the Monster Maintenance Manual book – Peter McMannis as he graciously allows us to use his book as a learning resource for students!

 

2016iLearnScope

2016DigitalNativeProgram

2016CopyWriteProgram

BOSTES and UNSW – how ICT impacts on curriculum and assessment . . .

How does ICT impact on curriculum and assessment? What a coincidence that I  presented the SAME topic TWICE in one week to TWO completely different audiences?

This week has been a busy one, TWO firsts – presenting to the BOSTES Inspector team AND to a uni class of Masters of Ed students at UNSW. The OTHER common factor between both of these events (besides being a first for me) was the topic ” Impacts of ICT on curriculum and assessment” . . .

The BOSTES presentation was with two other teachers – Gavin Hays, Assistant Principal  from Parramatta Marist and Andrew Burgess, E-Learning Co-ordinator from Lismore Diocese who operates the Online Education Centre. We each spoke about technology implementation, tools, challenges and successes in our school, the questions from the Inspector Team and Howard Kennedy (Director of Curriculum and Assessment Standards) were focused on curriculum support, access to classroom technologies, staff PD as well as supporting ICT’s with BOSTES tools such as program builder.

My own learning notes from the day were related to using PBL to heighten engagement, Google Classroom developments, challenges in selecting a good LMS and how we can teach stage related skills in ICTs throughout projects, tasks, classroom interactions and in online learning environments.

It was awesome to hear both Andrew and Gavin talk, I loved hearing about what they were doing in schools and how they were making positive changes for learning.

MY BOSTES presentation:

At UNSW I was lucky enough to be paired with Pip Cleaves in a class with 24 Masters of Ed students, John Bennett has been running similar talks with his class for the past three years – I could see the purpose and value in tonight solely by the classes questions and sharing.

Questions were related to: fitting in content amongst project work, being comfortable with trying something different, logistics, examples of KLA tasks, challenges in terms of internet connects and finance, classroom design, finding time, selecting tech tools for the right application, being a leader amongst staff, engaging students, differentiating content AND collaboration.

Pip’s experience is invaluable – her knowledge of platforms, tools, devices, classroom applications is so broad! I loved how she moved around the room and spoke with her hands! – this was novel to me as Pip and I have spoken MORE online than in real life 😉

Pip took a photo of me during the talk, being photographed while doing something like this is a little weird right? – I saved the image because one of the questions I asked of the class was “what would your students say of your teaching? & classes?” – in this photo I am looking through their eyes. Pip moved around in her zippy form, while I was more still? Being at the front of the room heavily instructing or information cramming it not something I am used to doing. So while I appreciate Pip’s gorgeous words, the image itself is JUST STRANGE!? and how I was still was strange?? – AND I did it TWICE in ONE WEEK?!

UNSW

My UNSW presentation:

It was a personal highlight to talk about the staff and students at Emmaus for the first time. Even though this is a new role and school community for me I felt so proud to share their great work with others. We are on an exciting learning journey!

My take aways from both of these presentations is that I am lucky to be in such great company professionally, likewise our students are in good hands. There are many challenges in the implementation of ICT in schools, these challenges do add another dimension to the work teachers have to do. However, each lot of presenters and audiences were focused on students learning and solving problems, the technologies that were discussed were referenced as tools to propel this.

LINKS and stuff I may have forgotten. . . . 

Example of a flipped youtube for TAS – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVUjn1QYo4g&feature=youtu.be

Teachers are using Weebly, this is what STUDENTS can do with WEEBLY – http://emmausdigitallearning.weebly.com/

MORE about the Student Techie Team – https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/student-techies-at-gilroy-voiced-2014/

Information about LEARNING INTENTIONS: http://www.assessmentforlearning.edu.au/professional_learning/learning_intentions/learning_intentions_landing_page.html

PINTEREST as a bookmarking TOOL- https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/using-pinterest-in-my-classroom/

HUGE thanks to my arty mate Jess McCarthy, she made my UNSW presso pretty amaze.

Emmaus Bytes – sharing byte sized updates

With teachers in a constant state of time poor – I wanted a way of sharing ideas, tools and articles in a regular format.

I came up with the idea of “Emmaus Bytes” late last term – Michael Pate helped me out by talking through requirements of an innovation newsletter. We discussed what Emmaus staff needed in terms of the PD they have already received and how the format was best presented.

The cheeky title is derived from the unit measurement – a byte. The concept of the update is to share smaller bits of information, sourced from articles and peers with links to further reading and ideas for classroom application.

 

Too often PD is over prescriptive – it leads to specific implementation and rigid ideas of do this then that. Teachers at Emmaus (and other schools I am sure) are apt in reading information and ideas, to then make a decision about its validity in their classrooms. It is not a take it or leave it approach – this approach starts discussions. Discussions that are driven by staff & students needs – not just me.

 

Examples of this working is in the first edition of Emmaus Bytes I included info about Weebly. With ideas of implementation, examples of Emmaus Weeblys and staff that were currently using the tool – our experts to talk to. This was a great success!  We now have multiple faculties and many individuals now using Weebly. Building on that, Emmaus Bytes edition TWO discussed ways of integrating critical thinking into Weebly, success criteria for students and extension activities – not just the technology – the pedagogy.

 

We are now up to our THIRD edition of Emmaus Bytes (found here)  – it has been a positive experience to share the good practice of staff in these editions and share ideas so that together we develop as a school staff – not in a linear one PD plan for all, but with byte sized ideas.

Student techies at Gilroy & VoicEd 2014

TODAY I presented at VoicEd 2014 at Davidson High School with loads of other ahhhhmazing and inspirational educators who are positively moving and shaking practice and processes in their schools and classrooms.

http://www.haikudeck.com/p/JtsMmatIXV

My presentation today was all about sharing and reflecting on the use of students as leaders, when I blogged about it last year I had an idea of WHY I wanted the program to run, and HOW It was going to look, but I REALLY underestimated the positive impact these students would have on our 1:1 program.

In todays presentation I explained HOW the Students Techies function so effectively at Gilroy, WHAT they do and WHY:

  • Students had to apply to become a class techie using a google form: applicants were chosen at the end of last year based on their ability to solve examples of tech problems like “What steps would you go through to fit a Wifi connection issue”
  • All the work they do counts as community service: all the “work” they do contributes to the community service program so they benefit for doing something they love!
  • Students assist on Edmodo: year 7/8 have a “tech-support group” that the Techies (and I) monitor, they respond to questions online, between 9 of them they manage the workload of this WONDERFULLY!
  • They do not miss out on class time: these students are academic, they want to help but not miss out on class time, so the program does not EVER impact on their learning.
  • Visit homerooms twice a week: I found that most technical problems arose overnight when they were trying to do something at home, if students don’t get the help they need on the tech-support page then they have face to face access to the techies of a morning, this is prime time to solve problems before the school day starts!
  • Young leadership role: year 8’s get forgotten as young leaders! We then expect them to step up in year 9/10?! Will eventually run well with Duke of Ed, SRC and captain program.
  • Empowers clever kids in the playground: this program gives them cred! year 7’s chat to them in the play ground (not just in the library!) and they are known as being Techies.
  • THEY LOVE TECHNOLOGY!  they like solving problems, making other students as confident as them and helping out!
  • I can’t possibly solve every technical issue! even as a singular member of a big technical staff we still teach, our allocation and volume of devices prevents us from being accessible to students all the time. Between Edmodo and homeroom visits, these guys have got it sorted!

 

The concept of peer coaching is a no-brainer. I know from experience that students helping students peer-peer in a classroom or school context works. It builds confidence, relationships and in a busy classroom it can ease the demand of teacher centred assistance and keep the pace of a lesson moving forward. Some students even PREFER to have peer assistance. Yeah “there are no silly questions”, however, putting a hand up and a spotlight on yourself to ask a question can feel daunting for some – so if it wasn’t for peer support questions sometimes by shy individuals may never get asked!!

 

The program so far is a HUGE success (because our Techies are brilliant kids of course!), I have taken a few snapshots of our Edmodo group so you can see these guys in action!

Untitled3 Untitled2 Untitled

 

 

 

 

 

original post found here

Year 7 iPad training day and the roll out process at Gilroy

This year as part of the 1:1 iPad rollout process in year 7 I was able to allocate a whole day for student training. The training day was planned so that year 7’s had a day of workshops that would provide them with the technical knowledge to operate their iPads in class as a learning tool. During the day they would learn how to operate key apps, focus on digital citizenship in line with our ICT policy, get their intranet usernames/login and set up their iPad with printing!

This was a FULL ON day to prepare and plan, but it was part of bigger roll out process that started in 2013 with the welfare team and parents:

  • 2013 Enrolment evening – among key important speakers the night also contained information about iPads, their expected use in classrooms and support docs for parents (in regards to purchasing, insurance and technical support)
  • 2014 year 7 parent evening – welfare focused information session, the year co-ordinator spoke about cyber safety, privacy and I spoke about practical ways to monitor/support technology use at home and parental controls were explained/applied.
  • Year 7 app roll out – students received usernames and passwords, they were given access to the MDM and received their school apps on their device (this happened on the friday so they could PLAY with the apps ALL weekend!)
  • Year 7 iPad training day – 5 sessions/workshops on iPad use.

It is important to note that the roll out process involved parents and the welfare team at Gilroy, this was a positive change from our previous laptop roll out process.

 

LOGISTICS OF THE iPAD TRAINING DAY!

The iPad training day would not have been successful without the help of the Integrated Learning teachers that each ran workshops, office staff that provided room changes, lesson cover and supervison, onsite technicians AND the student techies that assisted the classes in doing the hard stuff!

The 5 workshops students did were:

Session 1: Edmodo sign up/use and Gilroy student home page navigation
Session 2: Cyber safety and tech rules at Gilroy
Session 3: Self service, printing, iPad settings and MDM profiles
Session 4: Using your iPad in class (Notability, Bookcreator) sending files, exporting work
Session 5: Structured “play” – iPad skills bingo

Here is a copy of Ipad training day runsheet –  on the run sheet you can see the rotation of classes, teachers, workshops and student techies that were our support.

The week after the training day I surveyed students to measure the success of the day – based on their confidence in using the device as a learning tool in class, here are the results: survey results.

Overall I am happy knowing students don’t take their devices into classes knowing NOTHING, I know that teachers appreciated the fact that their first iPad lessons could run without stopping for a hand up with questions like “my printers aren’t connected” or “I can’t log on”.

The roll out process has now extended into a longer process, the benefits of this far outweigh any argument over invested time. With this cohort it has been fluid, with minimal hiccups and maximum support from CEO, technical staff, parents, welfare team and teaching staff.

Sings *students are doin’ it for themselves!

The concept of peer coaching is a no-brainer. I know from experience that students helping students peer-peer in a classroom or school context works. It builds confidence, relationships and in a busy classroom it can ease the demand of teacher centred assistance and keep the pace of a lesson moving forward. Some students even PREFER to have peer assistance, I know “there are no silly questions”, however, putting a hand up and a spotlight on yourself to ask a question can feel daunting for some – so if it wasn’t for peer support questions sometimes by shy individuals may never get asked!!

Based on all the positive experiences I have had with peer-coaching situations I put forward the idea to “hire” Gilroy Student Techies for 6 month contracts in 2014 to support our iPad program. This sounds all very formal, and the process was in order to be fair! Current year 7’s were asked to “apply” knowing that only EIGHT would be selected based solely on their application. The application was a Google form that outlined simple scenarios that they may encounter as a techie – asking them to respond with solutions of how they would help!

Untitled

In planning WHAT the class techies would/should do I was very cautious of them NOT losing out on class time, the students selected are hardworking and would then see this leadership role a negative experience if this was the case. A tough balance between using them efficiently and too much!

In 2014 the year 8 Student Techies will be used at Gilroy in the following manner:

  • One year 8 Techie will be in each year 7 homeroom to solve tech issues at the START of the day so as to minimise their impact on classes (typically a busy time as I have homeroom myself and site Technicians are assisting years 8-12 with laptops)
  • Support staff at the 2014 iPad training day for year 7 students
  • Help demonstrate effective iPad/technology use as a young school leader
  • Assist by being an additional member of the Year 7  Tech- Support Edmodo page to help with online questions

I am really looking forward to this initiative being a part of the reason why our iPad program will see student success – not just for those students that are Techies, but for all the opportunities that the Techies could potentially help in!

How “Integrated Learning” cross-curricular units work at Gilroy WITH 1:1 iPads

 

Solar powered robots - science link (power)

Solar powered robots – science link (power)

Over the past few months I have been chatting to teachers about cross-curricular projects and how they can logistically work in schools. Gilroy has been in a special position because historically there is a timetabled allocation for “Integrated Learning” in year 7.  This subject WAS started to use an “Intel” program, it later morphed into an ICT course, programmed to include the use of laptops students created movies, completed photoshop courses and learnt about different software packages.

This year was the first that students at Gilroy have had iPads, this change meant that the curriculum had to change as the technology had changed. I used this opportunity to create NEW cross-curricular units of work that used the ipad.

My only plans when creating units was to:

  • Include a digital citizenship module AND embed this into remaining course
  • Have options for extension, experimentation, play and groupwork
  • Each unit have a project outcome
  • Each unit have clear cross-curricular content that is purposefully mapped/matched to subject scopes
  • Progression in technological skills
  • Explicitly teach technological skills that could be transferred into other classrooms and contexts
  • Use feedback from staff that currently/previously taught IL

After I researched possible projects, looked closer at the Fluency Project, I created a scope and sequence based on a draft I hand wrote:

7 Scope and Sequence

7 Scope and Sequence

Then I began programming. So far students have completed 3 terms of these programs, they have run successfully with the aid of teachers who are willing to experiment and problem solve.  I have been relying on the teachers reflection on program registration to work on improving units for 2014. The hiccups along the way have mainly been concerned with the digital submission of projects, something that I am now working towards fixing.

Feel free to USE these programs, share your cross curricular units or send some feedback!

IMG_4007

Programs:

BASIC IPAD SKILLS – 8 lessons

MORAL OF THE STORY IL program

MY ROBOT IL program

MONSTERS IL program – – – thank you to the author of the book for allowing us to use his content!

Alternatives to CONFISCATION in a 1:1 environment

Yes, confiscation can be an effective method of classroom management that can temporarily remove a distraction at the teachers/year co-ordinators discretion. HOWEVER, in the instance of technological devices it does not teach appropriate use of technology, self control or social etiquette.

Over the last 2 terms we have been adopting a different approach to managing students that are distracted gaming or misusing technology  – this has been supported by our techie and welfare team because it has minimal impact on classroom function:

On Laptops:

– REMOVING all internet access

– DISABLING certain programs – itunes?  OR whatever they were using inappropriately?

– RESTRICTING ACCESS – so only word/finder/powerpoint (for example) can be used

Instructions: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-mac-parental-controls.html

On iPads:

– REMOVING apps/internet access

– RESTRICTING access to itunes/app store

– NEGOTIATING with parents for course of action

Instructions: http://ipad.about.com/od/iPad_Guide/ss/How-To-Enable-iPad-Parental-Controls-Restrictions.htm

WHY would you do this? – So students that use devices as part of their daily learning can still complete required tasks and not work avoid. Keeping in mind that much of our work set is reliant on edmodo, student access to online servers and software packages – USB files transfer is still available on all options for laptop and bluetooth transfer is still available on iPads. The aim is to still ALLOW the devices use, but restrict it (ie: take the fun out for a negotiated period of time).

Mobile phones: 

In regards to “phone etiquette”  I have been known to mimic student behaviour – for example I will take my phone out of my pocket and “text” while a student is in conversation with me – WHY? – so I can prompt them – “is this rude? why? this is what you did 5 mins ago? how is it different from me/you?”

I also adopt a “visibly off and invisible” approach to mobile phones if they are a nuisance, turn them off – put them away, this is not a blanket rule, it is only for those that cannot execute self control to keep it away during class activities/appropriate times. I do not like a “banned” policy in my classroom as there are so many instances where they can be useful and then the rules are confusing.

We need to remember that technology is NOT GOING AWAY – it is integrated into our lives, confiscation is not always a viable means to deter miss-use as it affects their productivity in other classes, there are other options that can be used, would love to hear your opinion and how you model appropriate use to your students.

Why is an iPad WORKFLOW so important ??

Whilst planning the 1:1 iPad program at Gilroy in year 7 last year, I reflected back to what I thought the key issues with the 1:1 laptop program were. In my mind, staff  learning/training was a challenge that was tackled over time, the underlying pedagogy of their use was also developed as time went on BUT the LOGISTICS of passing work from student to teacher and vise-versa was an issue that needed to be addressed FIRST as it is the first obstacle that would occur in the classroom. It is essential for teachers and students to be able to share work digitally in a almost paperless environment, so how could this be done on an ipad?

Firstly I mapped the EXISTING workflow for the laptop, including ALL the ways work and communication was exchanged digitally, aside from communicating on edmodo, we used wikis, blogs, school website, shared drives, USB’s and email. I believed this was too complicated for year 7’s and wanted a simpler approach.

I then RE-DREW the work flow, with limited/simplified and specific ways to distribute classwork, assessments and submission of formal tasks, this is what it looked like:

year_7_workflow

This workflow specified filetype as well as a simple procedure for distribution of content and submission of work. It used Edmodo to distribute class content and the school website (IRIS system) to make assessment tasks available for students and parents online. SendToDropBox is a third party application that allows student to email work directly from an iPad app to teachers DropBox accounts without affecting their DropBoxes privacy/sharing settings, effectively the sent email becomes their submission receipt.

FROM THIS POINT I was able to look at specific apps that we might need to purchase for staff and students, my number ONE focus at this point was that IF IT DIDN’T FIT WITH OUR WORKFLOW, WE DIDN’T USE THE APP! This greatly simplified the app selection process, and I believed simplified the classroom workflow for students and teachers once the iPads were in classrooms.

Six months on from their roll out, I can honestly say that not all staff work within this process – variations of this process include:

  • Emailing assessment tasks directly from teacher/student, this I believe adds extra complexity to marking digital files as attachements need to opened in email, and then opening in another app, whereas if they are opened direct from dropbox they can be marked /viewed easily from this point.
  • Staff keeping existing wiki’s instead of distributing content on Edmodo. Yes this works, but they have complicated things? It is another “thin” for students to log-into, it is not dynamic an collaborative like Edmodo, so in most cases they have BOTH a wiki/Edmodo group (confusing in some instances) AND not all wiki pages play nice with iPads.
  • Teachers ask students to download apps without pre-testing the workflow, then the day of tasks being due I get questions like: how do students submit or share work with each other from this app?? This is normally more complicated than anything really should be!
  • Work sent is LARGE in file size, too large for the sendtodropbox facility. So the techies and I researched an app that could share files over bluetooth and wifi – THIS was the best one that we tested was: WIRESHARE

Before you personally or as a school think about devices in a 1:1 or BYOD environment, I advise that the WORKFLOW between teachers and students is your FIRST priority. If sharing of content cannot happen easily, it really makes classrooms that use technology too difficult, and then the resisting arguments arise that “this is too hard, I might as well just photocopy and hand out a worksheet, it is easier” and yes, if a process is that complicated it would be difficult to argue the appropriateness of technology, as we all know that failures in seamless integration of technology can really get in the way of teaching 😦

I found that by making the workflow FIRST priority other challenges were easily solved as time went on.

Tutorials for STAFF to set up DropBox and SendToDropBox accounts and other relevant tech tutorials are available here: STAFF TECH TUTORIALS 

Chrome VERSUS Safari on the ipad

There has been MUCH discussion on this topic over the past week since ipads have come to school in year 7’s bags.

I know where my opinion stands, and was asked to write a newsletter article stating pros/cons from an education point of view. Here is my two cents, feel free to disagree, you know where the comment box is- I may not reply 😉

 

Year 7’s are getting into the swing of things with ipads- and there has been MUCH debate over which browser is best to use. This debate is much like an “apple versus android” dispute (it goes round and round in circles, pros and cons of each). But let’s look at it from an EDUCATION and CYBER SAFETY point of view, and here is what matters to OUR KIDS:

 Safari

  • Works with parental controls, allows for safer browsing, blocks explicit content if controls are set as such
  • Browsing history can be stored for reflection (and deleted too)
  • Slow processing speeds when loading webpages with lots of content
  • Works REALLY well with government initiative for cybersafety (reinforces our Pastoral and Integrated Learning program)
  • Downloads PDF files as necessary- does require an extra step than Chrome to do so
  • Easily collects bookmarks and offline reading
  • Default browser on ipad, all links automatically open in Safari, there is no changing this setting
  • Syncs favourites/bookmarks across mobile devices

 

 Chrome

  • Upon download, comes with a “age restricted warning” upon download to confirm you are over 17 (is this an attempt to say “there’s explicit content on the internet, not our fault if you access it??)
  • Can easily “incognito” browse so that history is not stored
  • DOES NOT enforce parental controls applied on the ipad
  • Happily plays flash content on sites
  • Quickly loads pages and downloads files/attachments

SO . . . they are SOME of the facts that are MOST relevant for our students, overall CHROME is a better performing browser. BUT, in my opinion SAFARI is a safer experience, this is also a school endorsed recommendation. Discuss this with your children, explain what and why we want to protect them on the internet.

Do you have the CYBER-SAFETY button installed on their ipad?? – – – -> http://www.dbcde.gov.au/online_safety_and_security/cybersafetyhelpbutton_download/install_apple

And in the true spirit of the internet, browsing and meme’s – I created one fitting:

meme