Alternatives to CONFISCATION in a 1:1 environment

Yes, confiscation can be an effective method of classroom management that can temporarily remove a distraction at the teachers/year co-ordinators discretion. HOWEVER, in the instance of technological devices it does not teach appropriate use of technology, self control or social etiquette.

Over the last 2 terms we have been adopting a different approach to managing students that are distracted gaming or misusing technology  – this has been supported by our techie and welfare team because it has minimal impact on classroom function:

On Laptops:

– REMOVING all internet access

– DISABLING certain programs – itunes?  OR whatever they were using inappropriately?

– RESTRICTING ACCESS – so only word/finder/powerpoint (for example) can be used

Instructions: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-mac-parental-controls.html

On iPads:

– REMOVING apps/internet access

– RESTRICTING access to itunes/app store

– NEGOTIATING with parents for course of action

Instructions: http://ipad.about.com/od/iPad_Guide/ss/How-To-Enable-iPad-Parental-Controls-Restrictions.htm

WHY would you do this? – So students that use devices as part of their daily learning can still complete required tasks and not work avoid. Keeping in mind that much of our work set is reliant on edmodo, student access to online servers and software packages – USB files transfer is still available on all options for laptop and bluetooth transfer is still available on iPads. The aim is to still ALLOW the devices use, but restrict it (ie: take the fun out for a negotiated period of time).

Mobile phones: 

In regards to “phone etiquette”  I have been known to mimic student behaviour – for example I will take my phone out of my pocket and “text” while a student is in conversation with me – WHY? – so I can prompt them – “is this rude? why? this is what you did 5 mins ago? how is it different from me/you?”

I also adopt a “visibly off and invisible” approach to mobile phones if they are a nuisance, turn them off – put them away, this is not a blanket rule, it is only for those that cannot execute self control to keep it away during class activities/appropriate times. I do not like a “banned” policy in my classroom as there are so many instances where they can be useful and then the rules are confusing.

We need to remember that technology is NOT GOING AWAY – it is integrated into our lives, confiscation is not always a viable means to deter miss-use as it affects their productivity in other classes, there are other options that can be used, would love to hear your opinion and how you model appropriate use to your students.

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Rolling out 1:1 iPads at Gilroy !!

Collection of files that were distributed to parents as part of the 2013 roll out:

FAQ’ s

APPS for first round purchase – year 7 2013

YEAR 7 – PURCHASING OF APPS

COMPARISION CHART OF iPAD MODELS

Stylus, case and keyboard recomendations

Post Purchase Instructions

iPAD preso for parent info night- with audio

Approved apps and games for holiday play

 

 

Link to – – -> SCOOP-it 

Link to staff – – -> TRAINING FOLDER (updated CONSTANTLY!!)

Hope these help others !!

BYOD workshop materials – apps, online tools and how you ACTUALLY DO BYOD in the classroom.

Excitably this year at the IIATE conference I ran a workshop on BYOD (bring your own device).

How can portable devices such as tablets, smart phones, laptops, iPads and iPods be integrated effectively into technology classes to enhance learning?
Online tools, apps, games and websites that are relevant to a wide variety of TAS subjects will be demonstrated. Bring your own device on the day (ALL platforms and device types are welcome).”

Here is my prezi introducing the concept/idea of BYOD- – – – > PREZI 

In the weeks prior to the workshop I employed the help of my PLN to gather additional resources, because other teachers in my PLN teach in differing subject areas AND different device types AND they are pretty clever!

Some of the responses looked like this:

I went through each app that was suggested compiling a list that worked with my workshop sections/audience (keeping in mind my workshop was for TAS teachers in a high school setting):

  1. APPS
  2. WEBSITES
  3. STUFF FOR TEACHERS
  4. STUFF FOR LATER

THIS info I then put into these handouts to be used on the day.

I chose to use QR codes as they are a GREAT way of getting A LOT of info into a small space – each QR code on the handout contained WHAT the tools DOES and HOW it could be integrated into the classroom. I can also attribute the groovy layout to comic life, SO EASY!!

PDF FILES:

Apps for BYOD

Websites for students BYOD

Stuff for teachers

STUFF TO CHECK OUT LATER- BYOD

HOW DO YOU DO BYOD IN YOUR CLASSROOM ??? ANY TIPS FOR NEWBIES OR SEASONED TECH HEADS??