Cultures of Thinking – Project Zero – Sydney

– I am so excited to share some of my notes with you from Saturday’s conference, it was a free PROJECT ZERO event at Shore School that I attended, it was much bigger than expected, with 550 registrations, a highlight of the day for me was seeing old friends and having time to have rich conversations with colleagues . . . . I will sum it up briefly by sharing some parts that were a standout for me. . . .
  
Ron Ritchhart was the keynote, his engaging talk covered some core Project Zero research projects . . . .
– The 8 cultural forces are:
Inline images 1
This video unpacks them nicely: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faXX-hETf68
 
An exercise he did with the audience was ask: “What are three things you did at the start of the school year to establish a culture of thinking amongst your students and in your classroom” it is a great reflective exercise and maybe one that you could do! – a follow up question was “what was one think you did to build that culture that you hadn’t done in the past”  — this is asked to acknowledge risks you take in the classroom to build better practice and deeper thinking. 
He then introduced the understanding map, this was really unpacked in great detail, so if you like the graphic below there is more information here: http://www.pz.harvard.edu/resources/understanding-map
Inline images 2
During his talk and my short workshops we were introduced to a simple questioning technique that makes students think deeper and use evidence: “what makes you say that” – maybe you could try using this questioning technique in your classes?
More reading on “What makes you say that” here —-> http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03d_UnderstandingRoutines/WhatMakes/WhatMakes_Routine.html
In my short workshops we were shown a thinking routine called “See – Think – Wonder” – this is used to encourage enquiry thinking, prompt students to seek their own research and to really build deep discussions about art, sources, artefacts and texts.
More info on the  “See – Think – Wonder” here —->  http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03c_Core_routines/SeeThinkWonder/SeeThinkWonder_Routine.html
The tweets the appeared on the #pzsydney hashtag really value added to the day! – Thank you to Andrea who created this awesome Storify:  https://storify.com/stringer_andrea/project-zero-sydney-pzsyd-25-feb-17#publicize
Thank you to the Project Zero team for hosting!
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BOSTES and UNSW – how ICT impacts on curriculum and assessment . . .

How does ICT impact on curriculum and assessment? What a coincidence that I  presented the SAME topic TWICE in one week to TWO completely different audiences?

This week has been a busy one, TWO firsts – presenting to the BOSTES Inspector team AND to a uni class of Masters of Ed students at UNSW. The OTHER common factor between both of these events (besides being a first for me) was the topic ” Impacts of ICT on curriculum and assessment” . . .

The BOSTES presentation was with two other teachers – Gavin Hays, Assistant Principal  from Parramatta Marist and Andrew Burgess, E-Learning Co-ordinator from Lismore Diocese who operates the Online Education Centre. We each spoke about technology implementation, tools, challenges and successes in our school, the questions from the Inspector Team and Howard Kennedy (Director of Curriculum and Assessment Standards) were focused on curriculum support, access to classroom technologies, staff PD as well as supporting ICT’s with BOSTES tools such as program builder.

My own learning notes from the day were related to using PBL to heighten engagement, Google Classroom developments, challenges in selecting a good LMS and how we can teach stage related skills in ICTs throughout projects, tasks, classroom interactions and in online learning environments.

It was awesome to hear both Andrew and Gavin talk, I loved hearing about what they were doing in schools and how they were making positive changes for learning.

MY BOSTES presentation:

At UNSW I was lucky enough to be paired with Pip Cleaves in a class with 24 Masters of Ed students, John Bennett has been running similar talks with his class for the past three years – I could see the purpose and value in tonight solely by the classes questions and sharing.

Questions were related to: fitting in content amongst project work, being comfortable with trying something different, logistics, examples of KLA tasks, challenges in terms of internet connects and finance, classroom design, finding time, selecting tech tools for the right application, being a leader amongst staff, engaging students, differentiating content AND collaboration.

Pip’s experience is invaluable – her knowledge of platforms, tools, devices, classroom applications is so broad! I loved how she moved around the room and spoke with her hands! – this was novel to me as Pip and I have spoken MORE online than in real life 😉

Pip took a photo of me during the talk, being photographed while doing something like this is a little weird right? – I saved the image because one of the questions I asked of the class was “what would your students say of your teaching? & classes?” – in this photo I am looking through their eyes. Pip moved around in her zippy form, while I was more still? Being at the front of the room heavily instructing or information cramming it not something I am used to doing. So while I appreciate Pip’s gorgeous words, the image itself is JUST STRANGE!? and how I was still was strange?? – AND I did it TWICE in ONE WEEK?!

UNSW

My UNSW presentation:

It was a personal highlight to talk about the staff and students at Emmaus for the first time. Even though this is a new role and school community for me I felt so proud to share their great work with others. We are on an exciting learning journey!

My take aways from both of these presentations is that I am lucky to be in such great company professionally, likewise our students are in good hands. There are many challenges in the implementation of ICT in schools, these challenges do add another dimension to the work teachers have to do. However, each lot of presenters and audiences were focused on students learning and solving problems, the technologies that were discussed were referenced as tools to propel this.

LINKS and stuff I may have forgotten. . . . 

Example of a flipped youtube for TAS – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVUjn1QYo4g&feature=youtu.be

Teachers are using Weebly, this is what STUDENTS can do with WEEBLY – http://emmausdigitallearning.weebly.com/

MORE about the Student Techie Team – https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2014/03/08/student-techies-at-gilroy-voiced-2014/

Information about LEARNING INTENTIONS: http://www.assessmentforlearning.edu.au/professional_learning/learning_intentions/learning_intentions_landing_page.html

PINTEREST as a bookmarking TOOL- https://moniquedalli.wordpress.com/2013/08/18/using-pinterest-in-my-classroom/

HUGE thanks to my arty mate Jess McCarthy, she made my UNSW presso pretty amaze.

Emmaus Bytes – sharing byte sized updates

With teachers in a constant state of time poor – I wanted a way of sharing ideas, tools and articles in a regular format.

I came up with the idea of “Emmaus Bytes” late last term – Michael Pate helped me out by talking through requirements of an innovation newsletter. We discussed what Emmaus staff needed in terms of the PD they have already received and how the format was best presented.

The cheeky title is derived from the unit measurement – a byte. The concept of the update is to share smaller bits of information, sourced from articles and peers with links to further reading and ideas for classroom application.

 

Too often PD is over prescriptive – it leads to specific implementation and rigid ideas of do this then that. Teachers at Emmaus (and other schools I am sure) are apt in reading information and ideas, to then make a decision about its validity in their classrooms. It is not a take it or leave it approach – this approach starts discussions. Discussions that are driven by staff & students needs – not just me.

 

Examples of this working is in the first edition of Emmaus Bytes I included info about Weebly. With ideas of implementation, examples of Emmaus Weeblys and staff that were currently using the tool – our experts to talk to. This was a great success!  We now have multiple faculties and many individuals now using Weebly. Building on that, Emmaus Bytes edition TWO discussed ways of integrating critical thinking into Weebly, success criteria for students and extension activities – not just the technology – the pedagogy.

 

We are now up to our THIRD edition of Emmaus Bytes (found here)  – it has been a positive experience to share the good practice of staff in these editions and share ideas so that together we develop as a school staff – not in a linear one PD plan for all, but with byte sized ideas.

EdmodoCon 2014 – an international edu-venture !

I am back home, have had a full nights rest and have a pile of marking and cup of espresso awaiting my attention – all is normal post EdmodoCon 2014 !!!

Still feeling totally overwhelmed by the enormity of it all and how far EdmodoCon has come since the first one in 2011.

I wanted to say a HUGE thank you to everyone in the Edmodo office that made EdmodoCon happen – technical staff – arranging the logistics of presentations, files and making me look/sound good live, the marketing team, staff that picked us up of the mornings and made sure we had coffee and breakfast when we arrived, people that organised accommodation and travel, engineers that listened to us chat about our Edmodo experiences. . . you are all amazing, the hospitality and support was wonderful away from home, thank you!!

Was so cool to meet such passionate and talented presenters that had so much to share! – what luck to be a part of the 2014 presenter team!!

. . .AND to everyone that participated in our session, tweeted us and was a part of the backchannel, Jess and I were humbled by the response from you – we feel very lucky to have such supportive teacher friends all over the world!
Looking forward to continuing our journey of learning together!

 

OH, of course, a huge thanks to JESS! – how lucky am I to have met a mate that I learn so much from, one that takes me to amazing places – like out for dumplings and of course, EdmodoCon.

 

Copy of presentation: Edmodo_is_like_an_onion FINAL

Edmodo Blog interview: https://blog.edmodo.com/2014/07/22/meet-monique-dalli-jessica-mccarthy-edmodocon-2014-speakers/

Video archive: https://edmodo.mediacore.tv/media/edmodo-that-unique-ways-to-connect-and-learn-by-mo

 

 

Guide for Twits and Tweachers that want to tweet!

Do you use or have you thought of using twitter? To get you started, here are some basic instructions and LINGO in a snapshot.

 

  • It isn’t just for “famous people” – a HUGE amount of teachers are on twitter!

 

  • Everyone has a twitter “Name”, it starts with an @ symbol, when you want to send a message or connect to a particular person, type the @ symbol, then their twitter name.

 

  • When you “Follow” someone, you subscribe to his or her tweet feed, people can subscribe/follow to you too!

 

  • If you are tweeting on a subject or topic, a # (hashtag) is a way of grouping like tweets, try searching #edtech , #ozengchat or #ozscichat and see what comes up!!

 

  • The more people you connect with, the more intuitive your account becomes. It will suggest “like minded accounts.” For example, if you follow many teachers, it will keep suggesting teachers,  or if you follow Justin Bieber, it may suggest other “artists” such as Miley Cyrus!

 

  • Tweets can only be 140 characters– YES you may have to sacrifice grammar and spelling 2 fit wot u wnt 2 say in n thts k!! 🙂

 

 

If you are after knowledge or information on a specific topic, search twitter using hashtags as search terms. TRY. . .  #literacy OR #edmodo  #gilroycc or #saidnoteacherever

 

SEARCH a hashtag, follow accounts, and SHARE what you find in turn. Another example. . .  I have found up to date info from the Board of Studies on their twitter rather than their website to be most helpful!

 

IF you found this useful – tweet me! @1moniqued OR RE-TWEET IT!!

 

Gilroy goes GOOGLE!!

Today I ran the FIRST lot of Google Apps training for Gilroy staff, the training was run in period sessions in small faculty groups. The Google apps are run through our new landing page CLASSM8 – it was a busy day exploring the apps we have available to us and an exciting start to our Google journey.

The key focus of today was to: demonstrate the TOOLS and APPS that GOOGLE host that could enrich our resources, add to our teacher tool kits and to find ways to make us more efficient!

 

Each faculty had a session that was tailored to them based on their curriculum and existing levels of technology implementation. Some highlights from todays sessions were:

  • Using Google Drive INSTEAD of Edmodo library!

Edmodo is a common LMS for us at Gilroy, however, its file storage system does not suit all staff. SO – I demonstrated how ALL of the files required for a unit could be stored in ONE resource folder in a Google drive. Then the LINK for that folder could be shared on Edmodo with students! This means that ALL file types can be supported regardless of file size (PDF, docs and videos) AND if the file link is shared with teachers they can ALL add in cool resources that students either use in class or as extra material to study/revise.

  • Using Google Calendar to manage faculty events

Faculties such as PDHPE and CAPA run many activities over and above their class load – I demonstrated how Google calendar could be used to manage faculty events such as rehearsals, try-outs, training, games and performances. They key idea behind using Google Calendar in a faculty is that MANY staff could edit/admin the calendar and MANY students could subscribe on their devices and be reminded of events they are involved in!

  • Using Blogger with class groups

Blogging is an excellent way of getting students to write and digitally author their work, blogs can have a public audience or they can be used as a means to check and practice responses. We found lots of purposes for blogging today – responding to articles with an argument, analysing artworks, journaling a process, documenting a PIP, collating a digital portfolio and general online “showing off” !  – we used theYear 7 Blog as an example of how students LIKE to write online and compared the features of both KidBlog and Blogger.

  • Using Google Groups to communicate across campuses!

I demonstrated how Google Groups would be a perfect tool to start a cross-campus dialogue between students. For example Groups could be used in a Visual Arts classroom to discuss artworks by students across different schools- WHY? to encourage a dialogue that expresses a written opinion and to also listen to others (outside their class-group), and to independently talk about something that could be topical or subjective (ie: tackling something difficult WITHOUT teacher prompting). It would also practice safe digital communication (still easily moderated by a teacher administrator) and encourage collaboration.

 

Other google tools beyond apps that were shared today: 

 

 

What do YOU use Google for in your classroom?? 

Alternatives to CONFISCATION in a 1:1 environment

Yes, confiscation can be an effective method of classroom management that can temporarily remove a distraction at the teachers/year co-ordinators discretion. HOWEVER, in the instance of technological devices it does not teach appropriate use of technology, self control or social etiquette.

Over the last 2 terms we have been adopting a different approach to managing students that are distracted gaming or misusing technology  – this has been supported by our techie and welfare team because it has minimal impact on classroom function:

On Laptops:

– REMOVING all internet access

– DISABLING certain programs – itunes?  OR whatever they were using inappropriately?

– RESTRICTING ACCESS – so only word/finder/powerpoint (for example) can be used

Instructions: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-mac-parental-controls.html

On iPads:

– REMOVING apps/internet access

– RESTRICTING access to itunes/app store

– NEGOTIATING with parents for course of action

Instructions: http://ipad.about.com/od/iPad_Guide/ss/How-To-Enable-iPad-Parental-Controls-Restrictions.htm

WHY would you do this? – So students that use devices as part of their daily learning can still complete required tasks and not work avoid. Keeping in mind that much of our work set is reliant on edmodo, student access to online servers and software packages – USB files transfer is still available on all options for laptop and bluetooth transfer is still available on iPads. The aim is to still ALLOW the devices use, but restrict it (ie: take the fun out for a negotiated period of time).

Mobile phones: 

In regards to “phone etiquette”  I have been known to mimic student behaviour – for example I will take my phone out of my pocket and “text” while a student is in conversation with me – WHY? – so I can prompt them – “is this rude? why? this is what you did 5 mins ago? how is it different from me/you?”

I also adopt a “visibly off and invisible” approach to mobile phones if they are a nuisance, turn them off – put them away, this is not a blanket rule, it is only for those that cannot execute self control to keep it away during class activities/appropriate times. I do not like a “banned” policy in my classroom as there are so many instances where they can be useful and then the rules are confusing.

We need to remember that technology is NOT GOING AWAY – it is integrated into our lives, confiscation is not always a viable means to deter miss-use as it affects their productivity in other classes, there are other options that can be used, would love to hear your opinion and how you model appropriate use to your students.

Why is an iPad WORKFLOW so important ??

Whilst planning the 1:1 iPad program at Gilroy in year 7 last year, I reflected back to what I thought the key issues with the 1:1 laptop program were. In my mind, staff  learning/training was a challenge that was tackled over time, the underlying pedagogy of their use was also developed as time went on BUT the LOGISTICS of passing work from student to teacher and vise-versa was an issue that needed to be addressed FIRST as it is the first obstacle that would occur in the classroom. It is essential for teachers and students to be able to share work digitally in a almost paperless environment, so how could this be done on an ipad?

Firstly I mapped the EXISTING workflow for the laptop, including ALL the ways work and communication was exchanged digitally, aside from communicating on edmodo, we used wikis, blogs, school website, shared drives, USB’s and email. I believed this was too complicated for year 7’s and wanted a simpler approach.

I then RE-DREW the work flow, with limited/simplified and specific ways to distribute classwork, assessments and submission of formal tasks, this is what it looked like:

year_7_workflow

This workflow specified filetype as well as a simple procedure for distribution of content and submission of work. It used Edmodo to distribute class content and the school website (IRIS system) to make assessment tasks available for students and parents online. SendToDropBox is a third party application that allows student to email work directly from an iPad app to teachers DropBox accounts without affecting their DropBoxes privacy/sharing settings, effectively the sent email becomes their submission receipt.

FROM THIS POINT I was able to look at specific apps that we might need to purchase for staff and students, my number ONE focus at this point was that IF IT DIDN’T FIT WITH OUR WORKFLOW, WE DIDN’T USE THE APP! This greatly simplified the app selection process, and I believed simplified the classroom workflow for students and teachers once the iPads were in classrooms.

Six months on from their roll out, I can honestly say that not all staff work within this process – variations of this process include:

  • Emailing assessment tasks directly from teacher/student, this I believe adds extra complexity to marking digital files as attachements need to opened in email, and then opening in another app, whereas if they are opened direct from dropbox they can be marked /viewed easily from this point.
  • Staff keeping existing wiki’s instead of distributing content on Edmodo. Yes this works, but they have complicated things? It is another “thin” for students to log-into, it is not dynamic an collaborative like Edmodo, so in most cases they have BOTH a wiki/Edmodo group (confusing in some instances) AND not all wiki pages play nice with iPads.
  • Teachers ask students to download apps without pre-testing the workflow, then the day of tasks being due I get questions like: how do students submit or share work with each other from this app?? This is normally more complicated than anything really should be!
  • Work sent is LARGE in file size, too large for the sendtodropbox facility. So the techies and I researched an app that could share files over bluetooth and wifi – THIS was the best one that we tested was: WIRESHARE

Before you personally or as a school think about devices in a 1:1 or BYOD environment, I advise that the WORKFLOW between teachers and students is your FIRST priority. If sharing of content cannot happen easily, it really makes classrooms that use technology too difficult, and then the resisting arguments arise that “this is too hard, I might as well just photocopy and hand out a worksheet, it is easier” and yes, if a process is that complicated it would be difficult to argue the appropriateness of technology, as we all know that failures in seamless integration of technology can really get in the way of teaching 😦

I found that by making the workflow FIRST priority other challenges were easily solved as time went on.

Tutorials for STAFF to set up DropBox and SendToDropBox accounts and other relevant tech tutorials are available here: STAFF TECH TUTORIALS 

To flip, or not to flip. THAT is the question. . .

Last year was a year of trying new things, amongst the new “things” I tried – – flipping my classroom was one. This post is a little reflection of my flipped experiences and the reasons WHY I dabbled in film making last year.

 

. . . We had an AMAZING teachmeet at Gilroy in August, Simon Harper AND Polly Dunning presented their experiences flipping their classroom, even though I was reading a lot about flipping and its benefits at the time they really inspired me to start.

NOTE: I am not an expert at flipping, in my limited experience of flipping and from my esteemed colleagues/online reading this is what I knew:

  • Flipping means students do traditional CLASSWORK at home 
  • Cleverly, teachers make this fun, presented in an engaging way (video)
  • AND the content that is covered is usually content that is traditionally covered in class
  • ALLOWING for MORE class time to be spent on the analysis and application of content.

Sounds like a GREAT idea right?! . . . yeah- it is BUT my reasons for flipping were TOTALLY DIFFERENT!! I teach across all areas of technology in junior years, this includes timber, textiles and food technology project areas. We have 5 lessons a fortnight (5 hours) and only a 13 week rotation to complete a program, booklet, design folio and practical project.  . . .HECTIC!!!

I loved the idea of flipping, because:

  • I typically demonstrated practical skills ONCE – then students had to mimick, copy or do
  • Students watched my practical demonstrations that may have shown ONE particular method for doing something, there could be many applications (of a timber joint or decorative technique for example) time usually constraint this OR the busy nature of classroom numbers did
  • My classes in 2012 had a diverse range of students- levels of language, literacy, numeracy as well as physical capabilities
  • Some students were getting frustrated- at not being able to achieve a level of practical quality they expected
  • Many students were visual learners, current resources were not tailored to their learning style
  • Students WANTED to be more independent, they wanted to succeed on their own.

So, what REALLY propelled my to start to flip was- MY STUDENTS WANTED to become an expert in practical skills, they needed to have a DEEPER understanding of “something” before they were confident to try and apply it (I just want to be clear on something, I am not talking about their willingness to fail/make mistakes) – I am saying they WANTED TO DO BETTER, THEY WANTED TO WORK HARDER, THEY WANTED TO KNOW MORE and OUR CLASSTIME and MY CURRENT TEACHING METHODS didn’t allow it!!??

So, flipping essentially added extra hours to my classes. I used vimeo to upload my own video/links to edmodo, I also used existing youtube videos and tube chop to edit them.

I sourced videos on garnish techniques, handling pastry, sewing a closed seam, creating your own applique from felt, setting up jigs for a trimmer/router, using a router to create inlays, making your own bees wax polish and making the perfect white sauce.

I also made my own videos! With the help of another staff member we pre-recorded food demonstrations- students watched these on average 3 times EACH (this was 30-40mins of video time??!!) Students were also creating/sharing their own videos?? “Miss – can I film you doing this and practice at home?”  – –  umm OF COURSE YOU CAN!!!  (by this stage, I had totally gotten over the fact that once recorded, by voice sounds like a kid’s!! lol)

I dont really know if this truly is “flipping” ?? as I still felt the need in most cases to demonstrate and conduct the SAME practical demonstrations in lessons – BUT the videos really supplemented this and addressed all the concerns I was having. . . .

THE RESULT: I had VERY HAPPY STUDENTS. Their quality of practical work improved because they were conducting more research at home – I know, this really is a “DERR” moment right? And this is not too dissimilar to the benefits that Polly and Simon had explained at the TeachMeet, but you have to understand, the motivation that DROVE me to spend the time preparing all the videos/links WAS. 

Again, I repeat – I AM NOT AN EXPERT OF FLIPPING, making videos or screencasting (check out Simons blog for inspiring examples of this). Is this even flipping?? dont think so??– BUT, my students were pretty happy.

Polly and Simon certainly showed me a way of adding another dimension to my teaching that I will continue to use in 2013 – I seriously advise you to start whatever hybrid of flipping suits you !!

Providing iPad training for staff OFF SITE using GOGGLE DOCS!!

Teachers are busy people, we work ourselves silly until the silly season and holidays are here, we usually have those final days at school reserved for professional development and learning but seriously  who’s really awake? listening? coherent? 

Gilroy had the first stage of the 1:1 2013 roll out during the last week of school- PERFECT TIMING for staff to receive an ipad  as they could spend the holidays playing and exploring- BUT the downside is that staff and myself were tired in the last week of term, and too busy winding up 2012 to even think of what’s going on in 2013.

The solution was to create a set of online tutorials – I thought about hosting these on a website, but that would mean they were static, stand alone tutorials without being dynamic and collaborative. I therefore chose to create a PUBLIC GOOGE DOC FOLDER, by changing a single folders accessibility I did not make all my Google Doc files public. I also decided that SOME TUTORIALS should be collaborative, and others should not, again, changing the share settings to suit.

tutorials sreen shot

Currently there are 15 files in the folder, some are numbered, this creates a flow of “lessons” – – – staff teaching year 7 next year have the expectation to complete the first 5 as they are detrimental to the ipads operation and work flow in our classrooms – but as I add more, it is up to them if they feel confident to go further!

The bonus of this is that staff can COMPLETE PD IN THEIR OWN TIME, WHEN THEY ARE REFRESHED AND READY, refer back to the tutorials when required either by saving them onto their computer or accessing them online.

TUTORIALS CAN BE FOUND HERE – – – -> https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0B-TXEjJntTRxb3g1NUo1SlRaVnc/edit

The files that are open for collaboration are for people to help shape, please contribute and add your ideas. Thank you to those who have already contributed, but also a specific thank you to Denise Lombardo as her “twitter teacher directory” is in there and has been MOST helpful 🙂

 

I have enabled sharing on the files so that others may use them too! Let me know what is useful to you and your colleagues 🙂